12.72015

Memories in the City

Posted by in The Gilgamesh Syndrome 0 Comments
sandL Meira returned to the city and went immediately to the central chamber where she sat on the floor squarely in the middle of its towering grandeur. Anima came so quickly Meira found herself exploring her memory almost as if it were her own. For a long time the land was green –supported by two major rivers carrying the nutrients down from the mountains in the south. It was green and it was cool and sometimes there was ice; sometimes the land was impermeable and completely barren. Sometimes there were winds, storms, and lethal showers of ice and rock. There were bad times when they stayed in the safety of the city for years – for hundreds of years.

Sarah came. She jumped into her mind with a new sort of urgency. Sarah, Sarai, of Abraham, Abram – so many names. Amtilai the Horite was there in her memories. Terah, her husband, took her from her father’s land beside the river in the south. The river came from the hills and lakes, flooding his banks, watering the land. It cane twice a year – every year. Amtilai was troubled in her husband’s land because she was not of his people. Their skin was light – their bodies heavy. She was tall and lean with fast legs and tight curls in her hair. The other women despised her, derided her and her language, her customs, her gods and her children. Abram, her son, had no friends. A loner he withdrew into himself and eventually turned on his father. He despised him and his idols; he despised his wife for not bearing children; he despised his brother for being the first born and for having many children. These were strong memories about strong feelings and much anger – so much anger in one man.

"Damascusfashion" by Pascal Sebah

“Damascusfashion” by Pascal Sebah

Meira went deeper, back to Catherine and Amana to a time when the Matriarchy was strong: when people thought before they acted; when the reptilian cortex was where it belonged and firmly under control. They had both lived in this city, had children here, buried their parents here and served on the councils that controlled the lives of the people – not just the people here, within these walls, but all people across the land to the east and further, much further, to the south. This city, she realised, had been the administrative centre of all communities from Babylon, in Mesopotamia, to Quetta, in the Indus Valley.

0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *